What's Ghee how do I make Ghee and why should I make ghee sweetsavant.com America's best food blog

What’s Ghee, how do I make Ghee and why should I make Ghee? I have the answer to your burning questions. This is NOT an authentic Indian recipe for ghee which is traditionally made with cultured cream. This is an Americanized (easy) version that is similar. Ghee is butter that has been melted, simmered, browned a bit and cooled. It’s strained to remove any brown bits and what you’re left with is a nutty, toasty flavored batch of butter fat.

Why should you make it? Well, butter burns at a low temperature, about 250 degrees, because of the milk solids present. If you strain out the milk solids you can cook with the remaining butterfat at a much higher temperature, about 400 degrees. This makes ghee a much better option for high heat cooking than butter.

It’s simple to make ghee, you just have to watch it and make sure ti doesn’t burn. I start with a pound of unsalted butter cut into chunks to help it melt more quickly. Some people use salted butter but I find it gets too salty as it concentrates. You could also use cultured butter (Trader Joe’s has a tasty one) which has a more fermented taste. It usually has salt as well so be aware of that. Try a few options and see what you like best. I let it simmer over medium/high heat for about two minutes to cook off the water. There is a bit of water in butter, it’s the water in butter turning to steam that makes puff pastry puff.

The butter will foam up a bit so be sure to use a pot that is at least 2 quarts for one pound f butter. The pot I used in the pictures below was a bit small, it didn’t boil over but I think you should use a larger pot just to be on the safe side.

What's Ghee how do I make Ghee and why should I make ghee sweetsavant.com America's best food blog

I turn the heat down to medium/low heat and let it cook for 6-8 minutes more or until the particles on the sides and bottom of the pot begin to turn brown. Those particles are the milk solids that you want to remove, but letting them get brown and toasty first adds a lot of flavor to the ghee.

You have to watch the butter closely at this point because it can go from browned to burned rather quickly. I shut the heat off at the first sign of browning because the ghee will continue to cook for a bit before it cools. If there is any foam on top of the ghee I skim it off with a spoon. some of the browned bits will fall to the bottom of the pan. After the ghee has cooled for 3 or 4 minutes I strain it through a mesh strainer and some cheese cloth. Don’t pour the browned bits in to insure they don’t get into your finished ghee. I strain it a second time just to make sure the ghee is clear.

What's Ghee how do I make Ghee and why should I make ghee sweetsavant.com America's best food blog

Pour the finished ghee into a heat proof container and let it cool to room temperature. Store the ghee tightly closed at room temperature for up to a month.

I used a few tablespoons of ghee in this recipe for roasted root vegetables and pomegranate. Shrimp with garlic, lemon and spinach would be delicious sauteed in ghee as would thinly pounded chicken breast.

What's Ghee how do I make Ghee and why should I make ghee sweetsavant.com America's best food blogYour ghee will become a bit thicker and cloudy as it cools so it may not be pour-able. That’s okay, just use a spoon and enjoy.

What’s Ghee, how do I make Ghee and why should I make Ghee? I hope I’ve answered all of your questions but if ┬áthere’s something else you’d like to know please ask your questions in the comments. Give ghee a try and see what you think. What would you make with it?

8 Comments

8 Comments on What’s Ghee, how do I make Ghee and why should I make Ghee?

  1. Hey, It's GinaB
    February 15, 2016 at 4:41 am (2 years ago)

    Great post Demietra. I’ve always wonder what exactly ghee is. Now I know what and how!

    Also Demetra, consider link up with me on Fridays at 9 in the Beautiful, Creative and Inspirered Kunk Up on MirrorWatching.com.

    Thanks,
    Gina

    Reply
    • Demetra Overton
      February 15, 2016 at 3:45 pm (2 years ago)

      Hi Gina, thanks so much for reading. I’ll definitely check out your link up.

      Reply
  2. John Rutherford
    February 6, 2016 at 10:49 pm (2 years ago)

    What about using ghee to confit some chicken breasts? If so, what herbs/seasonings would complement the flavors?

    Reply
    • Demetra Overton
      February 6, 2016 at 11:11 pm (2 years ago)

      Hi John. I haven’t tried using ghee to confit chicken but I can’t think of a reason not to. I think it would be delicious. Fresh thyme and a little allspice (very little because it’s strong. Maybe 2-3 whole allspice, fresh cracked) and salt would be great. To go in another flavor direction some hot chilies would be really tasty. Thanks so much for your comment. Please let me know how it turns out when you try it.

      Reply
  3. Ariana
    February 4, 2016 at 3:17 pm (2 years ago)

    Duuuude! I’ve been hearing ppl reference ghee a lot lately, but I wasn’t sure what it was. This explained things perfectly though. The process doesn’t sound so bad either. Whenever I take a brave moment to attempt to make some, it sounds like it would be good on root vegetables like you suggested. (I’ve just discovered that I like turnips) Do you think it would be good with fish as well?

    Reply
    • Demetra Overton
      February 4, 2016 at 3:32 pm (2 years ago)

      I think it would be great with fish Ariana. It is really easy to make, you just have to watch it to make sure it doesn’t boil over or burn. Please let me know when you try it, I can’t wait to see what you make with it. Thanks so much for reading.

      Reply

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